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Saturday, May 2, 2020 | History

5 edition of The Place of the Cross in Anglo-Saxon England (Pubns Manchester Centre for Anglo-Saxon Studies) found in the catalog.

The Place of the Cross in Anglo-Saxon England (Pubns Manchester Centre for Anglo-Saxon Studies)

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  • 28 Currently reading

Published by Boydell Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • British & Irish history: c 1500 to c 1700,
  • Christianity,
  • Social & cultural anthropology,
  • c 500 CE to c 1000 CE,
  • Art & Art Instruction,
  • Art,
  • England,
  • English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh,
  • History - General,
  • Architecture,
  • Art / History / General

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsCatherine E. Karkov (Editor), Sarah Larratt Keefer (Editor), Karen Louise Jolly (Editor)
    The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages192
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8950467M
    ISBN 101843831945
    ISBN 109781843831945


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The Place of the Cross in Anglo-Saxon England (Pubns Manchester Centre for Anglo-Saxon Studies) Download PDF EPUB FB2

/ Karen L. Jolly --The Crux Usualis as apotropaic weapon in Anglo-Saxon England / David F. Johnson --The cross as interpretive guide for Ælfric's Homilies and Saints' lives / Karolyn Kinane --Guthlac of Crowland and the seals of the cross / Jane Roberts --From sign to vision: the Ruthwell Cross and The dream of the rood / Calvin B.

Kendall. The Place of the Cross in Anglo-Saxon England by Catherine E. Karkov,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide. The Boydell Press £50 (); Church Times Bookshop £45 THIS is the second of three volumes making available new research presented at a series of conferences and seminars concerned with the cross in Anglo-Saxon art and society, which took place between and The Place of the Cross in Anglo-Saxon England March 20 The Place of the Cross in Anglo-Saxon England book and white, 1 line illustrations pages x cm Pubns Manchester Centre for Anglo-Saxon Studies ISBN:   Buy The Place of the Cross in Anglo-Saxon England (4) (Publications of the Manchester Centre for Anglo-Saxon Studies) by Karkov, Catherine E., Larratt Keefer, Sarah, Jolly, Karen Louise (ISBN: ) from The Place of the Cross in Anglo-Saxon England book Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : Hardcover. Trees held a central place in Anglo-Saxon belief systems, which carried into the Christian period, not least in the figure of the cross itself.

Despite this, the transience of trees and timber in comparison to metal and stone has meant that the subject has received comparatively little attention from scholars.

Anglo-Saxon England was early medieval England, existing from the 5th to the 11th centuries from the end of Roman Britain until the Norman conquest in It consisted of various Anglo-Saxon kingdoms until when it was united as the Kingdom of England by King Æthelstan (r.

It became part of the short-lived North Sea Empire of Cnut the Great, a personal. The Anglo-Saxons were a cultural group who inhabited Great Britain from the 5th century. They comprised people from Germanic tribes who migrated to the island from continental Europe, their descendants, and indigenous British groups who adopted many aspects of Anglo-Saxon culture and language.

The Anglo-Saxons established the Kingdom of England, and the modern. Sometimes the light thrown by Scandinavian place-names on the Anglo-Saxon landscape only seems to offer a pale reflection of reality or perhaps more exactly a negative view of it, as in the map of England and southern Scotland (Figure ), on which small open circles, black circles and open squares show the presence of settlements with names ending in the elements -bý, -thorp.

Alaric Hall, ‘The Instability of Place-Names in Anglo-Saxon England and Early Medieval Wales, and the Loss of Roman The Place of the Cross in Anglo-Saxon England book, in Sense of Place in Anglo-Saxon England, ed.

by Richard Jones and Sarah Semple (Donington: Tyas, ), pp. – The final publication is almost identical to these proofs. A list of corrections follows. A Corpus of Anglo-Saxon and Medieval Pottery from Lincoln Lincoln was the centre for a large Medieval pottery industry which flourished from the 9th to the 15th century.

Pottery produced in Lincoln was traded over a large part of the east midlands and beyond. Anglo-Saxon Cross This The Place of the Cross in Anglo-Saxon England book metre high, 9th century shaft of an Anglo-Saxon cross stands on the south side of the church.

The highest and oldest site in central Wolverhampton, it is likely to have served as a preaching cross prior to the founding of the church building. The landscape of modern England still bears the imprint of its Anglo-Saxon past. Villages and towns, fields, woods and forests, parishes and shires, all shed light on the enduring impact of the Anglo-Saxons.

The essays in this volume explore the richness. Book that contained the Anglo-Saxon poems - Beowulf, The wanderer, the wife's lament and others The Mead Hall - represents the cultural importance of a communal meeting place. Christian Chronology.

how Anglo-Saxon England was broken up. Stonehenge. This riveting and authoritative USA Today and Wall Street Journal bestseller is “a much-needed, modern account of the Normans in England” (The Times, London). The Norman Conquest was the most significant military—and cultural—episode in English history.

An invasion on a scale not seen since the days of the Romans, it was capped by one of the bloodiest and /5(17). The first place to go for information on any individual sculpture is the Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Stone Sculpture. Collingwood (originally published in ) was the first systematic attempt to classify the Northumbrian crosses, and it remains a good introduction to the field, even if some of the author’s dates and conclusions have been.

Trees were of fundamental importance in Anglo-Saxon society. Anglo-Saxons dwelt in timber houses, relied on woodland as an economic resource, and created a material culture of wood which was at least as meaningfully-imbued, and vastly more prevalent, than the sculpture and metalwork with which we associate them today.

Trees held a central place in Anglo-Saxon. The sundial from St. Gregory's Minster, Kirkdale in North Yorkshire. The inscription ostentatiously recalls the good works of one Viking, written in Latin, on an Anglo-Saxon church.

It translates: 'Orm, Gamal's son, bought St. Gregory's Mynster when it was all broken down and fallen and he let it be made anew from the ground to Christ and to St. But England did not share the new religious energy or enjoy the spiritual revival taking place on the continent. All this would have to wait for William to cross the channel.

Five hundred years earlier St Gildas had described the Britons as corrupt and the Anglo-Saxons as the instrument for the vengeance of God. / Gale R. Owen-Crocker and Win Stephens --Chip off the rood: the cross on Early Anglo-Saxon coinage / Anna Gannon --Crosses and conversion: the iconography of the coinage of Viking York ca.

/ Mark Blackburn --Performance of the cross in Anglo-Saxon England / Sarah Larratt Keefer --Hallowing the rood: Anglo-Saxon rites for consecrating. This book examines how Anglo-Saxon communities perceived and used prehistoric monuments across the period AD – Using a range of sources including archaeological, historical, art historical, and literary, the variety of ways in which the early medieval population of England used the prehistoric legacy in the landscape is explored from temporal and geographic : Sarah Semple.

Perceptions of the Prehistoric in Anglo-Saxon England represents an unparalleled exploration of the place of prehistoric monuments in the Anglo-Saxon psyche, and examines how Anglo-Saxon communities perceived and used these monuments during the period AD This book illustrates some of the exciting paths of enquiry being explored in many different fields of Anglo-Saxon studies - archaeology, legal history, palaeography, Old English syntax and poetic, Latin learning with its many reflexes in Old English prose literature, and others.

In all these fields it is clear that fresh perspectives may be achieved by examining even well-known objects and. The Blackwell Encyclopaedia of Anglo-Saxon England is a major reference-work covering the history, archaeology, arts, architecture, literatures and languages of England from the Roman withdrawal to the Norman Conquest (c - AD).

Drawing on contributions by scholars of international standing, the book comprises a series of some articles by contributors, /5(2). Alaric Halls Elves in Anglo-Saxon England is a scholarly work and like most academic texts is a bit dry and makes for slow reading.

However, despite that there are things to learn for the serious student of faerie lore, Anglo-Saxon culture or linguistics/5. In Ethelbert promulgated a law code known as the "Dooms of Ethelbert"; this is not only the first of several "Dooms" of Anglo-Saxon kings, it is the first known written law code in English.

Ethelbert's Dooms fixed the legal standing of the Catholic clergy in England as well as setting in place a good number of secular laws and : Melissa Snell.

The cross in early medieval England was so ubiquitous it became invisible to the modern eye, and yet it played an innovative role in Anglo-Saxon culture, medicine, and popular practice. It represented one of the most powerful relics, emblems, and images in medieval culture because it could be duplicated in many forms and was accessible to every.

Summary. Cross and Cruciform in the Anglo-Saxon World: Studies to Honor the Memory of Timothy Reuter is edited by Sarah Larratt Keefer, Karen Louise Jolly, and Catherine E. Karkov and is the third and final volume of an ambitious research initiative begun in concerned with the image of the cross, showing how its very material form cuts across both the culture of a.

The religious and ritual dimension to trees in the Anglo-Saxon world can be approached through the place-name bēam (‘tree’), and its dead counterpart stapol (‘post or pillar’). Whilst some instances of these words carry common-sense explanations, others imply special features, often in numinous places such as cult sites or meeting-places.

Britons in Anglo-Saxon England Nick Higham, Nick Higham The number of native Britons, and their role, in Anglo-Saxon England has been hotly debated for generations; the English were seen as Germanic in the nineteenth century, but the twentieth saw a reinvention of the German 'past'.

- Explore alfredeberle's board "Saxon Churches", followed by people on Pinterest. See more ideas about Anglo saxon history, Anglo saxon and England pins.

Derbyshire and Staffordshire: British Academy Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Stone Sculpture Hawkes, J. & Sidebottom, P., 7 DecLondon: British Academy. (Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Stone Sculpture; vol.

13) Research output: Book/Report › Book. Cross and Cruciform in the Anglo-Saxon World: Studies to Honor the Memory of Timothy Reuter is edited by Sarah Larratt Keefer, Karen Louise Jolly, and Catherine E. Karkov and is the third and final volume of an ambitious research initiative begun in concerned with the image of the cross, showing how its very material form cuts across both the culture of a Author: SARAH LARRATT KEEFER.

A new book reveals how some remains of the Anglo-Saxon past are hiding in plain sight – such as St Paul's Church in Jarrow, pictured, which is situated on the edge of the Tyne Car Terminal.

Anglo-Saxon England refers to the period of the history of the part of Britain that became known as England, lasting from the end of Roman occupation and establishment of Anglo-Saxon kingdoms in the 5th century until the Norman conquest of England in by William the Conqueror.

Anglo-Saxon is a general term referring to the Germanic peoples who came to. Found: The First Anglo-Saxon Building in Bath The discovery, in a city famed for its Roman ruins, may mark the site of England’s first : Isaac Schultz.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Anglo-Saxon England: Anglo-Saxon England Anglo-Saxon England Vol. 2 (, Hardcover) at the best online prices at eBay.

Free shipping for many products. Anglo-Saxon literature (or Old English literature) encompasses literature written in Anglo-Saxon (Old English) during the year Anglo-Saxon period of England, from the mid-5th century to the Norman Conquest of These works include genres such as epic poetry, hagiography, sermon s, Bible translations, legal works, chronicle s, riddles, and others.

In all there are. - Explore gbertholet's board "Things Anglo-Saxon", followed by people on Pinterest. See more ideas about Anglo saxon, Saxon, Saxon history pins. A History Buff’s Guide to Medieval London defeated the Anglo-Saxon king in the Norman invasion and was crowned king of a newly unified England.

William I’s coronation at Westminster Abbey. Anglo-Saxon England was incorporated into larger and overlapping cultural spheres centered pdf the Frankish kingdom and Scandinavia. The appearance from the late fifth century onward of Anglo-Saxon metalwork in Continental Frankish graves indicates the maintenance through intermarriage, immigration, and trade of close cross-Channel links.

The anthropological evidence is also of two kinds, viz.: download pdf The evidence of human remains, chiefly skulls from Anglo-Saxon burial-places, and that of similar remains of the same period from old cemeteries on the Continent; (2) the racial characters of people in various parts of Northern Europe and in parts of England at the present time.